Monday, July 27, 2009

Doggone!



Ah, what the heck ... I feel like following up a post about two dogs that I love with a little tribute to a record whose title features a canine exclamation: doggone!
– as in "Doggone, I've Done It."

Chronologically touring the CD collection, I today found myself easing into 1933; it's been a '32-'33 day: think Roosevelt defeating Hoover and Repeal the following year. One of the highlights of my day surely has been The Sisters, accompanied by The Brothers, jiving (as only they can) through an exceedingly cute number by a Dave Franklin, whom I can't, at the moment, recall having encountered elsewhere. This record, cut 6/17/32, is truly one of my all-time favorites:

Eight sprightly little introductory bars, setting the perfect tempo, and then the girls are off, drawling away. The Dorsey Bros., Mac (Tommy) and Lad (Jimmy), play an uncharacteristically minor role in this one but, still, that no one gave the Boswells better (or as fine) support is highly evident. The line-up is Tommy, trombone; Jimmy, clarinet, Bunny Berigan (
yeah!), trumpet; Joe Venuti, violin; Dick McDonough, guitar; Artie Bernstein, bass; Stan King, drums. ... Oh, and that's Martha, the eldest of the sisters, providing that fine piano comping; I love her on this side. A harmonious and inimitably swinging chorus and verse by Martha, Connee and Vet en masse and then Connee – the middle sister, vocal arranger for and heart and soul of the vocal trio – gets a chorus to herself; dig the accent and the Armstrongian sense of what's right for the moment. Next, Four String Joe, the michievous Mr. Venuti, serves up sixteen sassy bars (check out Martha behind him). ... And now – Bunny! Hear him getting on mike; the sudden increase in his volume gives the record an immediacy that you have to relish – you're right there in the studio. I love the way he negotiates the diminished chord in bar 9 of his spot. Listen hard for the great, too-soon-gone (from the planet) Dick McDonough. Fine, well-placed accents from Stan King.



Doggone, I've Done It

Music and Words by Dave Franklin

Doggone, I’ve done it – I’ve fallen in love;
Doggone, it hit me from heaven up above.
The day I met him, I knew I was gone;
My heart went kerplunk – oh boy, I was sunk.
Doggone, I’ve done it – I fell with a thud;
It must be springtime, ‘cos it’s in my blood.
Mr. Cupid sneaked behind and gave me a shove;
Doggone, I’ve done it – I’ve fallen in love.
Oh, you dog!

I don’t use strong expressions;
I’m known for my repression;
Nobody ever heard me swear.
But something’s gone and changed me;
It’s really disarranged me –
I’m cuttin’ loose and I don’t care.

Doggone, I’ve done it – I’ve fallen in love;
Doggone, it hit me from heaven above.
The day I met him, I just knew I was gone;

Heart went kerplunk – oh boy, I was sunk.
Doggone, I’ve done it – I fell with a thud;
It must be springtime, ‘cos it’s in my blood.
Mr. Cupid sneaked behind and gave me a shove;
Doggone, I’ve done it – I’ve fallen in love.

Doggone, I’ve done it – I’ve fallen in love;
Doggone, it hit me from heaven above.
The day I met him, I knew I was gone;
My heart went kerplunk – oh boy, I was sunk.
Doggone, I’ve done it – I fell with a thud;
It must be springtime, ‘cos it’s in my blood.
Mr. Cupid gave me a shove;
Doggone, I’ve done it – I’ve fallen in love.







It's The Girls!


Bunny ... Who else?


Oh, you dog ...



15 comments:

Tom the Piper's Son said...

What a line-up! Connie's voice is something else too.

This is a bit of a distant thread but ppeaking of Venuti - and, by association, Lang - I just realized this little number, Jigsaw Puzzle Blues performed by Danny Kirwan, the sometime guitarist for the early Fleetwood Mac (sometimes in tandem with his idol the great Peter Green) was taken from the famous recording and duplicates somewhat one of the solos on there - I'm not sure by whom (Venuti, maybe Jimmy Dorsey?)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLUyf0TyIZo

Tom the Piper's Son said...

That note was quickly dashed off - apologies: The original recording was by Venuti and Lang, 1933.

Trombonology said...

Not so distant; I'm glad you told me about this! Yup, it's Jimmy Dorsey's solo that was the inspiration. Geez, I could just hear JD's tone as I listened to Kirwan; it somehow came through the electric guitar. Had heard of but had never heard the early, pre-Stevie Nicks FM. So neat to find that there were so-called Rock artists of that period who had been influenced by someone besides the usual people – by whom I mean earlier Rockers. ... Jimmy Dorsey was a very impassioned player, a fine blues player. Some people think his reed tone was not so hot – he wasn't a guy to play section lead – but most everyone agrees that he knew his way around a clarinet, alto, even bari. A great musician. Thanks for bringing this Jigsaw to my attention.

I have a hunch I won't be bringing this to your attention, but I thought of you when I did a Jansch search at youtube and got a documentary, in sections, beginning with this. Marvelous stuff. I was dazzled by his technical skill immediately, but I'm almost ashamed to admit that it's taken me until just recently to see the emotion and atmosphere behind the guitar wizardry. Anyway, now I'm really digging those early albums.

Tom the Piper's Son said...

Aahh so it was Jimmy Dorsey! Lester dug him as well. I'll have to hear this record.
In a nutshell - the pre-"American" Fleetwood Mac was always a favorite.

I never really latched to the electric blues until I'd done some time as jazzplayer/listener. Then I appreciated the lyricism of players like Freddie King, B.B. and Albert King etc. But Peter Green REALLY sent me - especially his stuff with Fleetwood Mac before his "renouncement' around the early 70's.
What a gorgeous tone and lines. Kirwan idolized him and Green hired him on not long before he left.
here's a clip of a great Kirwan/ fleetwood Mac tune you may have heard radio-wise

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RslLbWNALnc&feature=PlayList&p=99D9466460C18FDA&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=6

Thanks much for this video clip of Jansch's Acoustic Routes - never seen it.
Connolly is an excellent host and Anne Briggs appearance is a real treat - Loved to hear her play Go Your Way My Love and i wish I could hear her do Wishing Well which one of my favorite jansch-performed tunes of hers.
More on this later....

Trombonology said...

I'm sure you have You Just Fight for Your Life: The Story of Lester Young, but I dragged out my copy to get the exact quote, on page 23 of the hardcover: "I had to make a decision between Frankie Trumbauer and Jimmy Dorsey, you dig? I wasn't sure which way to go, you dig? [...] Finally Trumbauer was my man. [...]"

(Had to omit Prez's trademark MF's, etc.; this is a family blog ... huh)

Prez may have chosen Tram, but his comment shows that he had a strong appreciation of JD, as did Bird.

Blues: Back in my days of listening heavily to Rock, I liked Cream a lot, but that was about as bluesy as I got. My attitude toward Blues-based material has, for years, been similar to my attitude toward folk: that it isn't inherently very harmonically interesting. You're stuck with a bunch of basic chords, in predictable, even dictated patterns. But I've begun to suspect, particularly with Blues, that the lyricism you mention comes through in the single note lines; it becomes as interesting as a skilled interpreter, like those you mention, is capable of making it.

Hadn't run across the Kirwan-FM "Sands of Time," but I very much enjoyed it for its churning quality, its sustained intensity. ... And I like minor chords. Your Kirwan intrigued me, so I checked him out at Wiki; got this, which explains the "Jigsaw Puzzle Blues" cover:
In an interview with Mike Vernon in June 1999, Green described Kirwan as "a clever boy who got ideas for his guitar playing by listening to all that old-fashioned roaring twenties big band stuff." He added that in those early days, Kirwan "was so into it that he cried as he played.

Peter Green (again, I'm embarrassed to admit) is another name I'd encountered many times without connecting it to a sound. Looked for him at 'tube and just started a documentary.

I bought those electric guitars, just to achieve finally a kid's dream (I should be grown up, by now) and now I don't want to touch the things. I just play the acoustic. Essentially, I'll always be an acoustic devotee; I like the tone. Even my earliest influence, The Beatles – I always liked to hear John strumming that Gibson against George's Gretsch or Ric. Maybe that's why I'm getting into Jansch now; I like to hear an acoustic played well.

Book done –

milan said...

I'm almost certain that Bird listened a lot to JD. So many strong connections to him.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcvuU-dWS7M

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbJeAMGwcKk

And on those clips he sounds so convincing and strong, just as Benny Goodman or Artie Shaw:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIgotaRa-3U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vd4P4IZJryc

Trombonology said...

Thanks for the links, Milan. Very fine examples of JD's virtuosity. You're right about those connections: Both had the tremendous facility, even at the briskest of tempi; were great blues players and imaginative improvisers. You can hear Jimmy's influence in Bird's approach.

... And however his detractors felt about his sound, I love Dorsey's tone on both alto and clarinet.

milan said...

Me to. Such intense, clear articulation, especially in technically difficult upper register of a clarinet.
I've heard thoughts that JD constantly playing out of tune, but that is not true.

Trombonology said...

I've heard the out-of-tune comment about Jimmy, too – as well as a remark on Frank Trumbauer's "sour" tone on the C-melody, an instrument with, from what I've read, inherent tuning problems. Yes, Jimmy had a really strong upper register. I love that distinctive sound of his – instantly identifiable, as is Trumbauer's.

milan said...

To be honest, I can't tell if such oppinions are close to the real thing going on there, while JD and FT played their solos. To my ears they both sound in tune, and I never heard problems with upper register or anything.

Trombonology said...

I feel the same. True virtuosi: JD & FT.

Sean said...

Is this blog still active? I hope so. :(

Trombonology said...

Well, it's being neglected while I contemplate a somewhat different approach. I really appreciate your interest, Sean, and hope to be back soon.

Clifton said...

I await your return with your eloquent and elegant commentary about the thing you love. That reminds me of a Jack Leonard recording ... "The things I love."
I had it on a 78. Nice tune, beautifully sung.

Trombonology said...

Hey, Clifton! I appreciate the kind encouragement; glad not to be forgotten. I've been just swamped up t'home ... but hope to return soon.

Oh, Jack Leonard ... Absolutely adore him – one of the most sincere-sounding vocalists I've ever heard. I've always thought it a shame that so many admirers of Sinatra in his Dorsey period felt the need to contrast Blue Eyes and his predecessor in a manner unfavorable to Jack.